Tuesday Photo Challenge • Back Catalog

Lines to keep us in

Back Catalog • the challenge seems quite simple really:
‘My challenge to you is to find an image in your back catalog that still grabs your attention and share it! Of course, if you want to re-interpret the image with what you have gained over the years, feel free to do so. Any kind of image is appropriate for this challenge! Let us know why this image still gets your attention!’

back catalog
Brooklyn Bridge in New York City, 2008

Here’s my (first) entry to Frank’s Tuesday Photo Challenge. Picking this photo from my back catalog was a far from easy process.

Anyways, walking across to the other side made me feel I was trapped in an aviary. I was told by one of the ‘natives’ the lines, or nets if you will, were put in place to avoid people jumping.

She quite clearly wasn’t a fan of Rudy Giuliani’s policies: ‘if you don’t know how to tackle the real reasons, it’s safest for your re-election to tackle the symptoms.’

I’ve often been amazed at the pragmatism of Americans.

A disclaimer. I’ve just been getting interested in digital photography. I traded my analog Nikon F3 and some older bodies and lenses for a digital Leica, but I don’t really carry it around much. Find it much too bulky. Most shots I simply take with my iPhone, and do some polishing afterwards…
The featured photo was taken with a cheap (as so many of my pics in my back catalog) Panasonic camera.

If you’d like to see more of my entries to photo challenges, just click here.

Istanbul lines • Lines&Squares #18 • FunPhotoChallengeLines

Istanbul lines

Istanbul lines
Istanbul lines

For Becky’s Lines & Squares Challenge and Cee’s Fun Photo Challenge (CFFC).

These Istanbul lines are where men wash their hands and feet before the enter the mosque.

For more, see for instance some New York lines, or simply see the sidebar.

Blues lines • Becky’s Lines & Squares #17

Picking away and singing the blues 16:9

Blues lines

Picking away and singing the blues
Picking away and singing the blues

For Becky’s Lines & Squares Challenge, Oct. 17.

Came across this blues-y busker on a trip to Valencia, Spain. I was so caught by him, his appearance, his repertoire and his introvert way of performing (the only way blues can properly sang, in my mind), that I stayed. For more than an hour or so. Afterwards I gave him a €20 note.

To my surprise he objected and wanted to give me at least half back in the small change he had. But I told him nowhere in Valencia, or in the world for that matter I could listen to blues like that, sitting on the front row for that little money. Bought his CD, which incidentally was called ‘Blues Lines‘.

For more, see for instance some New York lines, or simply see the sidebar.

Lines to keep us in • Becky’s Lines & Squares #15

Lines to keep us in

Lines to keep us in

Lines to keep us in

Here’s my entry to Becky’s Lines & Squares Challenge, Oct. 15.

I was told by one of the ‘natives’ the lines, or nets if you will, were put in place to avoid people jumping.

She quite clearly wasn’t a fan of Rudy Giuliani’s policies: ‘if you don’t know how to tackle the real reasons, it’s safest for your re-election to tackle the symptoms.’

If you’d like to see more of my entries to Becky’s Lines & Squares challenges, just click here, here, here or here.

Waiting • Six-Word Story Challenge

Waiting

for f***'s sake, are we there?

For f***’s sake, aren’t we there?

Japanese commuters, whether it’s by metro, bus, train etc. all share this one burning question when waiting for their means of transport to arrive during rush hour.

Paradoxically, waiting to arrive was worse than waiting to depart.

Submission for J.I. Roger’s Six-Word Story Challenge – “Waiting“.

Waiting• 2

A different slant (an easy one I know…)

Is that bloody train finally coming?

Is that bloody train coming finally?

Click here to see my submission for the entry for J.I. Roger’s Six-Word Story Challenge – Elixer.

Andy Warhol’s lines • Becky’s Lines & Squares #14

Andy Warhol's Lines

Andy Warhol’s lines

Andy Warhol's lines

Here’s my entry to Becky’s Lines & Squares Challenge, Oct. 14, which is sparked by Victoria C. Slotto’s post Warhol-Pop Art in Words. A wonderful explanation and tribute to one of the greatest artists of the 20th century (he’s up there with Edward Hopper and Tamara de Lempicka). Of these three, he’s truly the one who democratized art. Mostly just by idolizing ‘household brands’.

The Whitney Museum of Modern Arts wrote the following on the this piece:

Green Coca-Cola Bottles was created the year that Andy Warhol developed his pioneering silkscreen technique, which allowed him to produce his paintings through a mechanical process that paralleled his use of mass culture subjects. Here, the image of a single Coca-Cola bottle is repeated in regular rows, seven high by sixteen across, above the company’s logo. The repetitive imagery and standardized format evokes the look of mechanical reproduction, but the black outlines were probably stamped by hand from a single carved woodblock onto green areas printed in a grid pattern. This engenders subtle differences in the work’s pattern; each of the bottles differs in both the evenness of the green underpainting and in the clarity of its stamped profile. The bottles are also often slightly askew, disturbing the overall regularity of the grid and making them appear simultaneously handmade and individualized, streamlined and mass-produced. In his deadpan and ironic way, Warhol at once criticized and glorified the consumerist idols and surface values of America’s media-saturated postwar culture. “A Coke is a Coke,” he explained, “and no amount of money can get you a better Coke than the one the bum on the corner is drinking.”

If you’d like to see more of my entries to Becky’s Lines & Squares challenges, just click here, here, here or here.

Lines under my feet • Becky’s Lines & Squares #13

Lines under my feet lead pic

Lines under my feet

Lines under my feet square
Lines under my feet

Here’s my entry to Becky’s Lines & Squares Challenge, Oct. 13.

I took this shot of a rather confusing line ‘No entrance exhibition’ which somebody had pasted on the stairs of the main entrance to an art exhibition.

But please note the feet in sneakers on the left. We Dutch hardly take any notice of signs telling us what (not) to do. Unless it’s a ‘no parking’ sign. These tend to cost you dearly if you ignore them…

Which reminds me of our international sports club in Karachi, Pakistan, the good old Sind Club. The only way to access the bar was to walk across a grass lawn to the door. To avoid nagging wives dragging their husbands home, somebody had put a sign on the lawn saying ‘Women NOT allowed on the grass’. Not sure any of the expat wives ever obeyed that sign. My mother certainly didn’t.

If you’d like to see more of my entries to Becky’s Lines & Squares challenges, just click here, here, here or here.