Thursday Doors 21 May • Making Sense For The Postman

4 Letterboxes in the door

Thursday Doors 21 May • Making Sense For The Postman

In one of my previous posts I had focused on the number of doorbells per door, as an indication of the number of singles, couples or families living behind that door. But how does the postman make any sense of that?

Letterbox to the side
Letterbox to the side
Another letterbox to the side
Another letterbox to the side

One door, one name, one doorbell and one letterbox. Not much can go wrong here… so you think. Unless you’ve got an illiterate postman, or one one who doesn’t give a s***. Every year I receive dozens of letters that are clearly addressed to someone else. With a different address and a different zip-code. I stopped my mailman twice to confront him about it, quite nicely that is. At first. The grumpy bastard just didn’t give me any indication he gave a flying f***! Or maybe he was just masking his illiteracy. Or maybe both.

Another vertical letterbox beside the door
Another vertical letterbox beside the door
Letterboxes to the side and in the doors
Letterboxes to the side and in the doors

One thing I grant him, things can become a bit confusing, like in the above case. Which letterbox to use for #82? Or does it even matter?

Letterboxes to the side and in the doors 2
Another case of letterboxes to the side and in the doors
3 Letterboxes to the side
3 Letterboxes to the side
4 Letterboxes to the side
4 Letterboxes to the side
4 Letterboxes in the door
4 Letterboxes in the door

My postman isn’t the only one struggling. Delivery guys (girls) of door-to-door advertising folders and door-to-door weeklies have a hard time knowing what to deliver where. Hence the stickers you see

NO door-to-door advertising folders. NO door-to-door weeklies.

NO door-to-door advertising folders. YES to door-to-door weeklies.

Making Sense For The Postman for Norm‘s Thursday Doors 21 May.

To see more of my entries, click here

Thursday Doors 14 May • What’s Behind That Door

Doorway Flower Shop • Thursday Doors

Have you ever wondered, like me, what’s behind that door browsing through all the entries into Norm’s Thursday Doors challenge? In the western world we tend to keep our front doors firmly shut for a multitude of reasons. Not so in Cuba…

Doorway Flower Shop • Thursday Doors
Doorway Flower Shop • Thursday Doors

…where people tend to use their doorway to sell flowers for instance

…where people tend to leave their front door ajar

A Look Inside • Thursday Doors

…or have no front door at all

A Look Inside A Cuban Grocery Store • Thursday Doors
A Look Inside A Cuban Grocery Store • Thursday Doors

These photos are from my archive and were taken on a road trip through Cuba in 2016

For more of my submissions in this challenge, click here.

Clock Door • Thursday Doors May 7

Clock Door • Thursday Doors landscape

This Clock Door is my entry into Norm’s Thursday Doors challenge.

Clock Door • Thursday Doors
Clock Door • Thursday Doors

Over the past few months that I’ve been door-hunting, this is the only one with a large clock on top that I’ve come across. The clock has stopped working however, which is a shame. Took this photo at noon, this January.

For more of my submissions in this challenge, click here.

One Door, Many Bells • Thursday Doors

8 letterboxes, one door • thursday doors

One Door, Many Bells • Thursday Doors

For as long as anyone can remember there has been a housing shortage in the Netherlands. Even, or should I say especially, today. We’re short 80,000 affordable houses for rent, the so-called social rentals (sociale huurwoningen), primarily for young, starting families and couples.

Most of the houses behind the doors I’ve been showing were built for occupancy by one (affluent) family (and their servants). The family entrance usually consists of one, main front door. The servants’ door was usually on souterrain/basement level or a side-/back-entrance.

One way of solving this problem is to split up the 3- and 4-story houses into 3 or 4 different apartments, where each one would fit a starters-family. There are more than a few house-owners have converted their house(s) into separate apartments per floor. The front door then is the communal entrance.

3 bells, one door • thursday doors 1
3 Bells, One Door
3 Letterboxes, One Door
3 Letterboxes, One Door
3 Letterboxes, One Door
4 Bells, One Door • Thursday Doors
4 Bells, One Door

So far, it makes a lot of sense. Divvy up a house into maximum of 1 apartment per floor. But take a look at the following:

8 Bells, One Door • Thursday Doors
8 Bells, One Door
8 letterboxes, one door • thursday doors
8 letterboxes, one door

One Door, Many Bells for Norm’s Thursday Doors.

To see more of my entries, click here.

COVID-19 Door • Thursday Doors

COVID-19 door • Thursday Doors

For Norm’s Thursday Doors is this rather disturbing photo of what I’ve dubbed a COVID-19 door. I’ve thought about whether to post this photo or not, long and hard. But the relaxed way more than a few of us treat the quarantine rules and advice called for a hard confrontation in my case.

I never got to know Johan really, merely greeted him with a smile or a nod when I was passing by. But for me he was anything but an abstract statistic and his passing away due to Corona hit me harder than I had ever imagined. Johan is the first victim of this virus that I could actually put a face to. And suddenly this feeling of ‘it’s bad out there…but it won’t touch me’ was no longer there. I was an untouchable no more as it had reached the outer rings of my own little world.

COVID-19 door • Thursday Doors
COVID-19 door • Thursday Doors

Portico Doors Phenomena • Thursday Doors

184 & 185 Portico Doors • Thursday Doors landscape

For Norm’s Thursday Doors are these Portico Doors Phenomena. I guess many cities have them. I found these when walking the dog in my hometown the Hague. According to Wikipedia, this kind of architecture was developed to give shelter to the elements. I do believe however there were economic forces at play at the time.

They do present you with the opportunity though to cram 5 doors in a portrait sized shot.

5 doors •
5 doors
116, 118 & 120 Portico Doors •
116, 118 & 120 Portico Doors

This way, 6 doors fit in a portrait sized picture without a problem. Please note that the doors to the souterrains are different from the sets of twin doors giving access to the main house.

Corner houses do hardly pose a problem to this kind of architecture, as the 2 photos below show.

184 & 185 Portico Doors
184 & 185 Portico Doors
194 & 195 
Portico Doors • Thursday Doors
194 & 195 Portico Doors

Lastly, portico’s don’t always give access to s souterrain or basement.

As said, I shot these Portico Doors Phenomena within a 20 minute walk..

For next week, I’ve found some more twin doors

A Fairy Tale Door • Thursday Doors

A Fairytale Door • Landcape

For Norm’s Thursday Doors is this fairy tale door. Having followed this challenge for some time now, I’ve seen lots and lots of doors, big and small. But I have never seen them this small…

A Fairytale Door Landscape • Thursday Doors 2
A Fairy Tale Door • Thursday Doors 2

A sense of how small this ‘door’ is:

A Fairy Tale Door • Thursday Doors
A Fairy Tale Door • Thursday Doors

Even for fairy tale standards, this is a really small door.

Istanbul Sliding Shed Door • Thursday Doors

Istanbul Sliding Shed Door • Thursday Doors

A stark contrast with last week’s splendor is this Istanbul Sliding Shed Door for Norm‘s Thursday Doors.

Istanbul Sliding Shed Door • Thursday Doors
Istanbul Sliding Shed Door • Thursday Doors

While I had set my mind on photographing some more beautiful twin doors that I came across, a (self-imposed) quarantine because of a slight flu made me postpone that for another day. So I had to dig in my archives and found this decade old photo of a sliding door in Istanbul. Which was, at the time, in dire need of some TLC.